Whitehouse Independent School District

About MTA (Multisensory Teaching Approach)

 
 MULTISENSORY TEACHING APPROACH
 
MTA (Multisensory Teaching Approach) is the curriculum used by all the dyslexia interventionists in Whitehouse ISD.  It is a sequential program designed specifically for students with dyslexia to develop their language skills.  The curriculum is similar in many ways to the Take Flight program developed by Scottish Rite and the BLS (Basic Language Skills) curriculum developed by Neuhaus.  It is based on the pioneering work of Dr. Samuel Orton and Dr. Anna Gillingham and includes regular and systematic review of all the concepts taught up to that point.  The MTA program is divided into 7 Kits and begins with extremely basic concepts.  After each Kit, the students take a Mastery Check to ensure mastery of the material in that Kit.  Many factors determine how long any particular student will be in the MTA program.  
 
Kit 1 Big Ideas
Initial, Medial, and Final positions
Vowels and Consonants
Syllables (open and closed)
Accent (emphasis or stress in a word)
Base words, suffixes, and derivatives
The letters i, t, p, n, s, a, l, d, f, h
The FLOSS Rule
OTHER IDEAS IN KIT 1
Suffixes -s and -'s
Two sounds for the letter s
Words I and a
Reading doubled consonants
Distinguishing sentences from phrases
Possessives and Contractions
Irregular words (words that cannot be sounded out)
  
Kit 2 Big Ideas
Digraphs (two letters that come together to make one sound (ng, ck, oo, th))

Combinations (two letters that make two sounds but something unexpected happens (qu))

More suffixes (–ing, –less, –ness)

Syllable division VC’ CV

Three spellings of the (k) sound {(k) = k, c || ck}

Three instances when the spelling of the base word does not change when adding a suffix (bwCC, bwVV, bwVC + [C])

The rest of the alphabet

 
Kit 3 Big Ideas

Final Stable Syllables (like [ble[cle[fles[tle, etc.)

R-controlled Syllables (like erir, and ur)

Vowel-Consonant-E words (like cake, athlete, five, rope, and cube)

Bubble Rule (doubling the Medial consonant to protect the short vowel in the first syllable when the word has a Final Stable Syllable)

Rabbit Rule (doubling the Medial consonant to protect the short vowel in the first syllable)

Changing the base-word when adding a vowel suffix (like running, and beginner)

OTHER IDEAS IN KIT 3

Syllable Division VC CV’

Three sounds of suffix –ed

Spellings of (d) and (t)

More suffixes (-ed, -er, -est, -es, -en)

More contractions

A is often pronounced (o) after a lip-rounding

Final silent e

 

Kit 4 Big Ideas

Vowel y in the Final position (like fly and penny)

Reading Long Vowels in open, accented syllables (like acorn, equal, iris, opener, unicorn)

More spellings of the (k) sound {(k) = k, c || ckkkec}

More combinations (like ar = (ar), (er) and or = (or), (er))

Spelling Long Vowels in open, accented syllables (like acorn, equal, iris, opener, unicorn)

OTHER IDEAS IN KIT 4

Spell (z)

Spell (ks) in base words and derivatives

Digraph ai is regular for reading but not spelling

Syllable Division patterns V’ CV and V’ CCV

More suffixes

 
Kit 5 Big Ideas

Diphthongs (oi, oy, ou, ow)

Advanced Final Stable Syllables ([tion, [sion)

Prefixes

Changing the base-word when adding a vowel suffix (like hoping, and completed)

OTHER IDEAS IN KIT 5

Half Long Vowels

Kind, Old Words

Reading and spelling soft c (cedilla c like rice)

 
Kit 6 Big Ideas

Changing the base-word when adding a suffix (like candied, and flier)

Latin and Greek roots/stems

Spelling the (j) sound {(j) = j, g || dge, ge}

Reading soft g {g = (j)}

Long vowel sound digraphs  

OTHER IDEAS IN KIT 6

French suffixes –ous and –age

Spelling (s) {(s) = s, c || ss, se, ce}

Spelling (u) {(u) = u, a || a}

Syllable Division patterns V CCV’ and VCCCV

 

Kit 7 Big Ideas

Digraphs regular for reading but not spelling

Syllable Division patterns VC V’, V’ V, V V’, and V CCV’

Reading 3- and 4-syllable words

Medial Greek y

Stable French Endings